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Charles Arnold

charlesa

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Involved Projects and Packages

Virtual Machine Viewer provides a graphical console client for
connecting to virtual machines. It uses the GTK-VNC widget to provide
the display, and libvirt for looking up VNC server details.

vm-install can define a Xen virtual machine, and cause an operating
system to begin installing within that virtual machine.

vm-install can be used in a variety of ways:

* It can be used interactively or non-interactively.

* It can automatically pick reasonable VM defaults for a given type
of operating system.

* It can perform completely non-interactive installs, driven via XML
files and/or command line parameters.

* The supporting Python modules can be 'import'-ed into other
Python programs, to create VMs programmatically.

Bugowner

Xen is a virtual machine monitor for x86 that supports execution of
multiple guest operating systems with unprecedented levels of
performance and resource isolation.

This package contains the Xen Hypervisor. (tm)

Modern computers are sufficiently powerful to use virtualization to
present the illusion of many smaller virtual machines (VMs), each
running a separate operating system instance. Successful partitioning
of a machine to support the concurrent execution of multiple operating
systems poses several challenges. Firstly, virtual machines must be
isolated from one another: It is not acceptable for the execution of
one to adversely affect the performance of another. This is
particularly true when virtual machines are owned by mutually
untrusting users. Secondly, it is necessary to support a variety of
different operating systems to accommodate the heterogeneity of popular
applications. Thirdly, the performance overhead introduced by
virtualization should be small.

Xen uses a technique called paravirtualization: The guest OS is
modified, mainly to enhance performance.

The Xen hypervisor (microkernel) does not provide device drivers for
your hardware (except for CPU and memory). This job is left to the
kernel that's running in domain 0. Thus the domain 0 kernel is
privileged; it has full hardware access. It's started immediately after
Xen starts up. Other domains have no access to the hardware; instead
they use virtual interfaces that are provided by Xen (with the help of
the domain 0 kernel).

Xen does support booting other Operating Systems; ports of NetBSD
(Christian Limpach), FreeBSD (Kip Macy), and Plan 9 (Ron Minnich)
exist. A port of Windows XP was developed for an earlier version of
Xen, but is not available for release due to license restrictions.

In addition to this package you need to install the kernel-xen and
xen-tools to use Xen. Xen 3 also supports running unmodified guests
using full virtualization, if appropriate hardware is present. Install
xen-tools-ioemu if you want to use this.

[Hypervisor is a trademark of IBM]

Bugowner

This YaST module configures and installs a virtual machine.

Virtual Machine Manager provides a graphical tool for administering
virtual machines.

Virtual Machine Viewer provides a graphical console client for
connecting to virtual machines. It uses the GTK-VNC widget to provide
the display, and libvirt for looking up VNC server details.

vm-install can define a Xen virtual machine, and cause an operating
system to begin installing within that virtual machine.

vm-install can be used in a variety of ways:

* It can be used interactively or non-interactively.

* It can automatically pick reasonable VM defaults for a given type
of operating system.

* It can perform completely non-interactive installs, driven via XML
files and/or command line parameters.

* The supporting Python modules can be 'import'-ed into other
Python programs, to create VMs programmatically.

Bugowner

Xen is a virtual machine monitor for x86 that supports execution of
multiple guest operating systems with unprecedented levels of
performance and resource isolation.

This package contains the Xen Hypervisor. (tm)

Modern computers are sufficiently powerful to use virtualization to
present the illusion of many smaller virtual machines (VMs), each
running a separate operating system instance. Successful partitioning
of a machine to support the concurrent execution of multiple operating
systems poses several challenges. Firstly, virtual machines must be
isolated from one another: It is not acceptable for the execution of
one to adversely affect the performance of another. This is
particularly true when virtual machines are owned by mutually
untrusting users. Secondly, it is necessary to support a variety of
different operating systems to accommodate the heterogeneity of popular
applications. Thirdly, the performance overhead introduced by
virtualization should be small.

Xen uses a technique called paravirtualization: The guest OS is
modified, mainly to enhance performance.

The Xen hypervisor (microkernel) does not provide device drivers for
your hardware (except for CPU and memory). This job is left to the
kernel that's running in domain 0. Thus the domain 0 kernel is
privileged; it has full hardware access. It's started immediately after
Xen starts up. Other domains have no access to the hardware; instead
they use virtual interfaces that are provided by Xen (with the help of
the domain 0 kernel).

Xen does support booting other Operating Systems; ports of NetBSD
(Christian Limpach), FreeBSD (Kip Macy), and Plan 9 (Ron Minnich)
exist. A port of Windows XP was developed for an earlier version of
Xen, but is not available for release due to license restrictions.

In addition to this package you need to install the kernel-xen and
xen-tools to use Xen. Xen 3 also supports running unmodified guests
using full virtualization, if appropriate hardware is present. Install
xen-tools-ioemu if you want to use this.

[Hypervisor is a trademark of IBM]

Bugowner

This YaST module configures and installs a virtual machine.

Virtual Machine Manager provides a graphical tool for administering
virtual machines.

Virtual Machine Viewer provides a graphical console client for
connecting to virtual machines. It uses the GTK-VNC widget to provide
the display, and libvirt for looking up VNC server details.

vm-install can define a Xen virtual machine, and cause an operating
system to begin installing within that virtual machine.

vm-install can be used in a variety of ways:

* It can be used interactively or non-interactively.

* It can automatically pick reasonable VM defaults for a given type
of operating system.

* It can perform completely non-interactive installs, driven via XML
files and/or command line parameters.

* The supporting Python modules can be 'import'-ed into other
Python programs, to create VMs programmatically.

Bugowner

Xen is a virtual machine monitor for x86 that supports execution of
multiple guest operating systems with unprecedented levels of
performance and resource isolation.

This package contains the Xen Hypervisor. (tm)

Modern computers are sufficiently powerful to use virtualization to
present the illusion of many smaller virtual machines (VMs), each
running a separate operating system instance. Successful partitioning
of a machine to support the concurrent execution of multiple operating
systems poses several challenges. Firstly, virtual machines must be
isolated from one another: It is not acceptable for the execution of
one to adversely affect the performance of another. This is
particularly true when virtual machines are owned by mutually
untrusting users. Secondly, it is necessary to support a variety of
different operating systems to accommodate the heterogeneity of popular
applications. Thirdly, the performance overhead introduced by
virtualization should be small.

Xen uses a technique called paravirtualization: The guest OS is
modified, mainly to enhance performance.

The Xen hypervisor (microkernel) does not provide device drivers for
your hardware (except for CPU and memory). This job is left to the
kernel that's running in domain 0. Thus the domain 0 kernel is
privileged; it has full hardware access. It's started immediately after
Xen starts up. Other domains have no access to the hardware; instead
they use virtual interfaces that are provided by Xen (with the help of
the domain 0 kernel).

Xen does support booting other Operating Systems; ports of NetBSD
(Christian Limpach), FreeBSD (Kip Macy), and Plan 9 (Ron Minnich)
exist. A port of Windows XP was developed for an earlier version of
Xen, but is not available for release due to license restrictions.

In addition to this package you need to install the kernel-xen and
xen-tools to use Xen. Xen 3 also supports running unmodified guests
using full virtualization, if appropriate hardware is present. Install
xen-tools-ioemu if you want to use this.

[Hypervisor is a trademark of IBM]

Maintainer

Factory development project for virtualization-related packages

Maintainer

Hivex is a library for extracting the contents of Windows "Registry
Hive" files. It is designed to be secure against buggy or malicious
registry files.

Maintainer

libguestfs is a set of tools for accessing and modifying virtual machine (VM)
disk images. You can use this for viewing and editing files inside guests,
scripting changes to VMs, monitoring disk used/free statistics, P2V, V2V,
performing partial backups, cloning VMs, and much else besides.

Maintainer Bugowner

QEMU is a quick emulator, using dynamic translation (TCG). In support of virtualization, it also serves as a frontend for KVM and as a backend for Xen device emulation.

Note that this package is produced using a Git based workflow. Please refer to README.PACKAGING before making modifications.

Maintainer

The SPICE client provides access to a remote machine's display and devices.
The SPICE server library is used by virtualization software (eg kvm) to expose
a (virtual) machine's display and devices to a SPICE client.

Maintainer

A Javascript Spice client

headers defining SPICE-protocol

Maintainer

supermin is a tool for building supermin appliances. These are tiny
appliances (similar to virtual machines), usually around 100KB in size,
which get fully instantiated on-the-fly in a fraction of a second when
you need to boot one of them.

Maintainer Bugowner

NOTE: Automatically created during Factory devel project migration by admin.

Maintainer
Maintainer
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